Below you will find templates for resume writing  and some cover letter examples.

But first, bare the following in mind:

Both your cover letter and resume need to be tailored for specific jobs. If you are saturating all available positions with applications, this will be exceedingly tiresome. BUT, it is absolutely crucial if you are serious about succeeding.

Perhaps send generic ones out to those positions you have less interest in, but give all you have to the positions that you would really like.

Cover Letter Examples and Advice

theguardian.com, Tuesday 14 February 2014

http://careers.theguardian.com/covering-letter-examples

Cover letters are the first chance you have to impress an employer – they're not just a protective jacket for your CV. Here's our guide on what to include and how to format them.

The first thing a potential employer sees in your job application is the cover letter. This doesn't just support your CV – it's an opportunity for you to stand out from the crowd and persuade the recruiter to put you through to the next round.

Be wary of spending hours on perfecting your CV at the expense of your cover letter. If you need some inspiration on what to include and what format to use, here are our helpful guides – just remember not to copy them as exact templates.

1. Standard, conservative style

This is ideal for sectors such as business, law, accountancy and retail. For more creative sectors, a letter like this might be less appealing, and could work against you.

 

Dear Mr Black,

Please find enclosed my CV in application for the post advertised in the Guardian on 30 November.

The nature of my degree course has prepared me for this position. It involved a great deal of independent research, requiring initiative, self-motivation and a wide range of skills. For one course, [insert course], an understanding of the [insert sector] industry was essential. I found this subject very stimulating.

I am a fast and accurate writer, with a keen eye for detail and I should be very grateful for the opportunity to progress to market reporting. I am able to take on the responsibility of this position immediately, and have the enthusiasm and determination to ensure that I make a success of it.

Thank you for taking the time to consider this application and I look forward to hearing from you in the near future.

Yours sincerely

2. Standard speculative letter

This may vary according to the nature of the organisation and the industry you're applying to.

Dear Mr Brown,

I am writing to enquire if you have any vacancies in your company. I enclose my CV for your information.

As you can see, I have had extensive vacation work experience in office environments, the retail sector and service industries, giving me varied skills and the ability to work with many different types of people. I believe I could fit easily into your team.

I am a conscientious person who works hard and pays attention to detail. I'm flexible, quick to pick up new skills and eager to learn from others. I also have lots of ideas and enthusiasm. I'm keen to work for a company with a great reputation and high profile like [insert company name].

I have excellent references and would be delighted to discuss any possible vacancy with you at your convenience. In case you do not have any suitable openings at the moment, I would be grateful if you would keep my CV on file for any future possibilities.

Yours sincerely

3. Letter for creative jobs

We've used the example of a copywriter but you can adapt it for your profession. The aim of a creative letter is to be original and show you have imagination, but understand what the job entails. Balance is essential: don't be too wacky, or it will turn off the reader.

Dear Ms Green,

·       Confused by commas?

·       Puzzled by parenthesis?

·       Stumped by spelling?

·       Perturbed by punctuation?

·       Annoyed at the apostrophe? (And alliteration?)

Well, you're not alone. It seems that fewer and fewer people can write. Unfortunately, there are still a lot of people who can read. So they'll spot a gaffe from a mile off. And that means it's a false economy, unless you're 100% sure of yourself, to write your own materials. (Or to let clients do it for themselves.)

To have materials properly copywritten is, when one considers the whole process of publishing materials and the impact that the client wishes to make, a minor expense. Sloppiness loses clients, loses customers.

There is an answer. Me. Firm quotes are free. You can see some of what I do on my multilingual website at [insert web address]. If you'd like, I can get some samples out to you within 24 hours. And, if you use me, you'll have some sort of guarantee that you can sleep soundly as those tens of thousands of copies are rolling off the presses.

Luck shouldn't come into it!

With kindest regards

Resume Writing Advice and Some Templates

3 December 2014, Stacie Renna

Successful candidates keep their pool of knowledge updated regarding the latest trends in resume writing. Every employer needs to hire proactive and dynamic candidates. A conventional and old fashioned resume reflects a dull personality, while a resume in line with modern trends reflects a dynamic personality.

The job marketplace evolves constantly, therefore, the ideal resume transforms into something significantly different every couple of years. A decade back resumes were really long and unstructured. Today resumes have literally become single paged, formatted and branded advertisements of candidates.

The following is some useful information that will help you in keeping up-to-date with the job market’s rapidly changing demands as you enter the job market for 2015!

Format and Layout

The future belongs to resumes with catchy layouts. Customize your resume format to optimize your qualifications and experience. Do not use generic resume templates at any cost.

Purpose

 Always understand the purpose of you resume before beginning to write it – the purpose is to land an interview and if you keep this in mind, you have a good chance of ensuring that you write a good one

Vivid and Short Story Telling Approach

The trend of stating accomplishments objectively is rapidly vanishing. This style is too common to stand out. Employers now prefer to read accomplishments written like very brief stories. For example ‘Enhanced revenues by 30% through effective business relationships building’ must now be replaced by something like: ‘Implemented effective business relation building approaches effectively and revitalized the company’s clientele which resulted 30% enhancement in revenue’.

Relevance Matters

Since time is becoming an unaffordable commodity with every passing day, importance of relevance in resumes is enhancing. The moment the prospective employer comes across any irrelevant detail in your profile, s/he is sure to lose interest and will definitely discard the resume straight away. Make sure you provide all the relevant information; information that shows your job relevant skills and expertise.

Top to Bottom Rule

The classic top to bottom rule still stands valid in the resume writing market today and will continue to do so. The most relevant and best points must be stated at the top of each section since these serve to hook the reader.

Bullet or Heading

Usage of bullets is very common. To set your resume apart in the competitive market of 2015, consider adding a brief bold or italic heading to each bullet in the experience section.

Add Some Colour

Conventionally, resumes are black and white and continue to be so till date. However, highlighting some key sections or core competencies by using some colored font can also help in setting your resume apart.

Computer Friendly

The coming era is a digital one and printed resumes are about to go obsolete. Learn some tips to make your resume computer friendly, i.e. translate it into PDF to ensure it reaches the employer exactly in the manner you formatted it.

Stacie Renna is a former Executive Recruiter from Manhattan and current Internationally Certified Executive Resume Writer.

See linkedin article: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141203193804-29036708-a-few-important-resume-tips-for-2015-are-you-ready

 

Template 1

Header, document and CV title:
Your first and family name to appear at the top of each page — not "CV"


CV template rules: Maximum length is two pages (if possible); do use an internet friendly font such as Ariel or Times New Roman and don’t use heavy graphics, tables, images or complex formatting that may corrupt when your CV is emailed. It would be better to include a link to a webpage or share a file.

Profile
About 30 to 40 words that describe you, the skills, experience and recent qualifications (if relevant) that you have attained that make you a good hire in your desired role. Guard against listing your own personal ambitions here, as you will be competing against less risky hires who may have proven track records in your desired role. Aim to demonstrate the value that you can bring to an organisation, through applying your work skills and attitude.

Work history
Starting with your most recent first, and using up to three examples, list your work history. Detail the organisation that you worked for, the start and finish dates and your job title. If you are still employed put current as the end date for the job you still do. If you are nervous about naming the company that you work for, describe it instead (for example, major multiple/supermarket chain instead of Tesco or Sainsbury’s). Don’t describe role and responsibilities, instead talk about your achievements and contributions to the business. It’s not what you did but how you did it that counts. Highlight the achievements that relate to the task in hand; showcase the expertise that your prospective employers will most value in your next role or job.

For example: Helped devise a project to improve customer engagement which resulted in 30% more customer enquiries. This in turn led to a 20% increase in revenue.


Qualification description
List your highest qualification and any relevant recent courses that you have completed here. Detail the institution that you studied at, the start and finish date, subject, the type of qualification and the grade. If you have completed a course to ready yourself for your career change, use about 30 words to describe it here. Where possible, evidence how you were able to apply the theory to deliver best practice.

For example: Applied bid and letter writing techniques learned via professional fundraising course in a volunteering role at local children's charity and raised £10,000 from a variety of trusts, grants and business sponsors.

Awards and membership of professional bodies
Don’t hide your talents under a bushel. Here list all relevant awards and membership of professional bodies that will strengthen your application. Detail years of membership for professional bodies, the awarding body’s name and date for any awards received. Avoid jargon, and if you’ve won the "most prestigious" award in something describe it.

For example:

Campaign's Rising Star Marketer of the Year 2006 for NSPCC Break the Cycle campaign.

Social media board member of the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising since 2008.


Interest and hobbies
List your interests and hobbies here. If you have an interest that is more of a passion, where your talent has been recognised, describe it in greater detail here, up to 30 words. Again be mindful that it’s not just what you did, but how you did it that will impress a prospective employer. Consider the interchange between life/work skills here also, this can be a useful way of showing that you can do a job well, even if you lack specific experience in it.

Contact details

 List your email, mobile number and home address (if relevant) at the bottom of every CV page. Don’t use a jokey email, such as This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., if this could be seen as immature or foolish. Also consider what you publish online; employers do check social media, even for senior roles — so expect to be Googled…

Template 2

Header, document and CV title
Your first and family name to appear at the top of each page — not "CV"


CV template rules: Maximum length is two pages; do use an internet friendly font such as Ariel or Times New Roman and don’t use heavy graphics, tables, images or complex formatting that may corrupt when your CV is emailed. It would be better to include a link to a webpage or share a file.

Profile
A statement of about 30 to 40 words that describe your work skills, such as highly organised, ability to work in a team or alone, motivated by a challenge. Don’t just list your own personal ambitions here, employers want to hire people that will contribute and add value to organisations — so, what are you going to do for them?

Qualification description
List the institution that you studied at, the start and finish date, subject, type of qualification and the grade.

If you specialised at any point or did a paper or project that is relevant to the type of job that you would like to do, write about it here, but use no more than 40 words. Help your prospective employer by avoiding jargon, explaining any new ways of being graded and talking up the benefits of what you have studied. Remember anyone can learn the theory, you need to demonstrate that you can apply it and that it’s useful. If you are a recent post-graduate, also list your AS level qualifications, including where and when you studied for them, the subject and the grade. If you are a mature, recently-qualified FE student, list your highest qualification (in the same way as above) only.

For example: Researched, planned and authored 12,000 word dissertation on new trends in information sharing via social networks  — managed deadlines, liaised with dissertation co-ordinator and developed analytical and research skills by successfully interviewing 10 experts for advice and opinion to inform paper. Findings to be published on online news site Mashable.

Work history
Great if you have one; list your most recent jobs first, picking out the skills that you used and expertise that you developed that’s relevant to the type of work you are interested in doing. Detail the organisation that you worked for, the start and finish dates and your job title. If you are nervous about naming the company that you work for, describe it instead (for example; major multiple/supermarket chain instead of Tesco or Sainsbury’s). Don’t describe role and responsibilities, instead talk about your achievements and contributions to the business. It’s not what you did but how you did it that counts.

For example: I helped devise a project to improve customer engagement which resulted in 30% more customer enquiries. This in turn led to a 20% increase in revenue.

Interest and hobbies
List your interests and hobbies here. If you have an interest that is more of a passion for you, where your talent has been recognised or awarded, describe it in greater detail here — up to 40 words. Again, be mindful that it’s not just what you did, but how you did it that will impress a prospective employer. Consider the interchange between life/work skills here also.

Awards and membership of professional bodies
Don’t hide your talents under a bushel here, if you got 100% in your cycling proficiency or grade 6 on the piano, for example, list your achievements. Again, detail the awarding body, the date and the grade, and describe what the award represents.

References

Use the name, job title and contact details of a course leader, mentor or professor at your university, or an employer here.

Contact details

List your email, mobile number and home address (if relevant) at the bottom of every CV page and be mindful of the differences between work and play. Don’t use a jokey email, such as This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., if this could be seen as immature or foolish. Also consider what you publish online, employers do check social media, even for senior roles — so expect to be Googled…

Template 3

Header, document and CV title
Your first and family name to appear at the top of each page — not "CV"


CV template rules: Maximum length is two pages; do use an internet friendly font such as Ariel or Times New Roman and don’t use heavy graphics, tables, images or complex formatting that may corrupt when your CV is emailed. It would be better to include a link to a webpage or share a file.

Profile
About 30 to 40 words that describe you and the skills, experience and recent qualifications (if relevant) that make you an expert. Aim to demonstrate the value that you can bring to an organisation, as you are likely to be a high-ticket value hire. Focus on evidencing that you are a visionary with substance; for example, that you are able to help organisations in transition and implement change as well as recognise that it needs to happen.

For example: A contemporary digital marketer with more than 10 years' senior sales and marketing cross-sector experience. Able to see the bigger picture and follow through on the minutiae of detail — this approach delivers tangible and sustainable competitive advantages for businesses.


Work/project history
Starting with your most recent first, and using up to three examples, list your achievements. Detail the organisation that you worked for, the start and finish dates and your job title or the project. If you are still employed put current as your end date for the first job that you list. If you are nervous about naming the company that you work for, describe it instead (for example use: large major multiple or supermarket chain instead of Tesco or Sainsbury’s). The focus of this section is to demonstrate how your nous and insight got a project done better, on time and within budget.

Awards and membership of professional bodies
This is a critical section for you, where you can prove your talent and credibility. Detail years of membership for professional bodies, and the awarding body’s name and date for any awards received. Avoid jargon, and if you’ve won the ‘most prestigious’ award in something describe it.

For example:

Campaign's Rising Star Marketer of the Year 2006 for NSPCC Break the Cycle campaign

Social media board member of the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising since 2008

Qualification description
List your highest qualification and any relevant recent courses you have completed here. Detail the institution that you studied at, the qualification, start and finish date, subject, type of qualification gained and the grade. If you have completed a course that is specific to the next project or role that you want to take on, use about 30 words to describe it in greater detail here. Evidence how you were able to apply the theory to deliver best practice.

For example: Applied bid and letter writing techniques learned via professional fundraising course in a volunteering role at local children's charity and raised £50,000 from a variety of trusts, grants and business sponsors.

Interest and hobbies
List your interests and hobbies here. If you have an interest that has won you an award, detail it here describing the awarding body, the level and date that you received the award.

References

You could use the name, job title and contact details of a high-profile past employer or client here.

Contact details
List your email, mobile number and home address (if relevant) at the bottom of every CV page. Consider online PR and check what is published about you. Expect your prospective employer to check social media and to Google you. Get there first and, if you haven’t already done so, create an internet CV or website to showcase your work. Consider rich media; a prospective employer would far rather watch a one and a half minute video than read a four page CV. Include your website link in your contact details.

Template 4

Header, document and CV title:
Your first and family name to appear at the top of each page — not "CV"


CV template rules: Maximum length is two pages; do use an internet friendly font such as Ariel or Times New Roman and don’t use heavy graphics, tables, images or complex formatting that may corrupt when your CV is emailed. It would be better to include a link to a webpage or share a file.

Profile
About 30 to 40 words that describe you and the role — such as leading tax accountant — or sector that you have progressed within. Describe work skills, such as highly organised, ability to work in a team or alone, motivated by a challenge. Be cautious not to just list your own personal ambitions, employers want to hire people that will contribute and add value to organisations, no matter what the seniority of the prospective hire.

Work history
Starting with your most recent first, and using up to three examples, list your work history. Detail the organisation you worked for, the start and finish dates and your job title. If you are still employed put current as the end date for the first role you list. If you are nervous about naming the company that you work for, describe it instead (for example, major multiple/supermarket chain instead of Tesco or Sainsbury’s). Don’t describe roles and responsibilities, instead talk about your achievements and contributions to the business. It’s not what you did but how you did it that counts. Highlight achievements that relate to the task in hand; showcase the expertise your prospective employers will most value in your next role or job.

For example: Helped devise a project to improve customer engagement which resulted in 30% more customer enquiries. This in turn led to a 20% increase in revenue.


Qualification description
List your highest qualification and any relevant recent courses that you have completed here. Detail the institution that you studied at, the qualification start and finish date, the subject, the type of qualification and the grade.

For example: Applied bid and letter writing techniques learned via professional fundraising course in a volunteering role at local children's charity and raised £50,000 from a variety of trusts, grants and business sponsors.

Awards and membership of professional bodies
Don’t hide your talents under a bushel here; list all relevant awards and membership of professional bodies that will strengthen your application. Detail years’ of membership for professional bodies, and the awarding body’s name and date for any awards received. Avoid jargon, and if you’ve won the ‘most prestigious’ award in something describe it.

For example:

Campaign's Rising Star Marketer of the Year 2006 for NSPCC Break the Cycle campaign

Social media board member of the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising since 2008

Interest and hobbies
List your interests and hobbies here. If you have an interest that is more of a passion for you, where your talent has been recognised; describe it in greater detail here, up to 30 words. Again be mindful that it’s not just what you did, but how you did it that will impress a prospective employer. Consider the interchange between life/work skills here also.

Contact details

List your email, mobile number and address (if relevant) at the bottom of every CV page. Don’t use a jokey email, such as This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., if this could be seen as immature or foolish. Also consider what you publish, employers do check social media, even for senior roles — so expect to be Googled…

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